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2012年10月26日星期五

Indigenous People 2012



On 11 October 2012, the United Nations Postal Administration will issue 18 commemorative stamps in denominations of US$ 0.45, CHF 0.85 and € 0.70 in a mini-sheet format of six stamps each on the theme "Indigenous People". This is the third in a series of stamps on Indigenous People, which were painted by the artist Stephen Bennett (USA).




The Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples was adopted by the United Nations General Assembly in 2007. The Declaration is the most comprehensive statement of the rights of indigenous peoples ever developed, giving prominence to collective rights to a degree unprecedented in international human rights law. It emphasizes the rights of indigenous peoples to live in dignity, to maintain and strengthen their own institutions, cultures and traditions and to pursue their self-determined development, in keeping with their needs and aspirations. The adoption of this Declaration is the clearest indication yet that the international community is committing itself to the protection of the individual and collective rights of indigenous peoples.



Indigenous people are the inheritors and practitioners of unique cultures and ways of relating to other people and to the environment. Indigenous people have retained social, cultural, economic and political characteristics that are distinct from those of the dominant societies in which they live. Despite their cultural differences, the various groups of indigenous people around the world share common problems related to the protection of their rights as distinct peoples.



Estimates point to more than 370 million indigenous people in some 90 countries worldwide. While they are from diverse geographical and cultural backgrounds, they share challenges such as lack of basic health care, limited access to education, loss of control over land, discrimination, forced assimilation, abject poverty, displacement, human rights violations, and economic and social marginalization.



Indigenous people around the world have sought recognition of their identities, their ways of life and their right to traditional lands, territories and natural resources; yet throughout history, their rights have been violated. Indigenous peoples are arguably among the most disadvantaged and vulnerable groups of people in the world today. The international community now recognizes that special measures are required to protect the rights of the world's indigenous peoples.


€ 0.70
 
 

Stamp Specifications




Format: 30 mm horizontally by 40 mm vertically, perforation to perforation



Perforation: 13.5



Marginal inscriptions: The vertical mini-sheets of six stamps have one marginal inscriptions in the center of the bottom margin. The marginal inscription consists of the United Nations emblem with the text "United" above and the text "Nations" below the emblem. One copyright symbol with the year 2012 appears in the lower left margin. The artist's signature appears in the lower right margin.



Sheet size: The sheet size measures 110 mm horizontally by 140 mm vertically.



Quantity: 234,000 stamps (39,000 sheets)



Printing: The stamps were printed in offset by the Lowe-Martin Group (Canada).



Selling Units: The full sheet of six different stamps will be considered as a single unit and is the only selling unit for this issue. Customers with standing order requirements for se-tenant of mini-sheet and for mini-sheet will receive this issue through their account.



The designs:



Top row (from left to right):

Daniel the Adventurer Chile (Easter Island), 2000

Penan Girl from Bario Malaysia (Sarawak), 2006

Golden Amber Lhasa Lady China, 2012



Bottom row (from left to right):

Forbidden City Princess China, 2012

White Paint United Republic of Tanzania, 2003

Grandma Apple Cheeks Mongolia, 2012

The Artist




This is the third United Nations stamp issue on Indigenous People that features portraits which were painted by Stephen Bennett (USA), who lives and works in a large church (c. 1854) in Pennsylvania that he converted into his art studio.



Mr. Bennett is a dedicated portrait painter who travels to far corners of the world seeking out indigenous people as subjects for his portraits. Young, old, joyful and withered faces populate these vibrant canvases that have been painted with layers of translucent colours that he has hand-mixed from pure pigments. He entices us to look deeply into the eyes of his subjects to realize that we all share a common humanity.



Ultimately, he is driven by a desire to complete an international exhibition of 1,000 portraits from the world over, painted by his own hand. This enormous project is ambitious, but needed at a time when the world is particularly conflicted. All too often indigenous peoples are pushed to the fringes of modern society. The power of these colourful portraits and their public exhibition helps return the beauty and relevancy of indigenous people to a genuine level of social and cultural importance, much to the benefit of us all.



His work has been used to promote and preserve cultures in the United States, Mexico, Sint Maarten, Panama, French Polynesia, Seychelles, the United Republic of Tanzania, Namibia, Australia, Indonesia, Malaysia and Papua New Guinea. In 2011, he explored China, Japan and Mongolia, those subsequent portraits being included in this issue for 2012.



Mr. Bennett has a keen sense of observation and the ability to bring out the beauty of a face. He succeeds in his artistic endeavours thanks to his appreciation of human differences, his generosity and his desire to understand others. He has a special ability to express and bring light to a face by his play with colours. For him, a face is a treasure.



In 2003, Mr. Bennett founded Faces of the World, Inc., a not-for-profit organization that is dedicated to expanding global awareness of people through art education and cultural exchange. He works internationally, teaching portrait workshops and creating exhibits that help children and adults alike take pride in their culture through portraiture. Faces of the World is funded from the sale of Mr. Bennett's paintings, donations and sponsorship. For more information, visit www.facesoftheworld.net.



Mr. Bennett states, "I am a portrait painter because of my passion for the wonderful diversity of the world's people. My portraits convey a fusion of my feelings for each subject with an intuitive use of colour. I intensify them in celebration of that person's existence. I hope my portraits reveal that every person of every race and culture is interconnected, indispensable and radiant with astonishing beauty." Mr. Bennett extends an invitation to all to suggest new ways in which his work can be used as a forum for cultural awareness.



The first set of Indigenous People stamps designed by Mr. Bennett was issued in October 2009 and the second in October 2010.





Stamp Specifications




Format: 30 mm horizontally by 40 mm vertically, perforation to perforation



Perforation: 13.5



Marginal inscriptions: The vertical mini-sheets of six stamps have one marginal inscriptions in the center of the bottom margin. The marginal inscription consists of the United Nations emblem with the text "United" above and the text "Nations" below the emblem. One copyright symbol with the year 2012 appears in the lower left margin. The artist's signature appears in the lower right margin.



Sheet size: The sheet size measures 110 mm horizontally by 140 mm vertically.



Quantity: 258,000 stamps (43,000 sheets)



Printing: The stamps were printed in offset by the Lowe-Martin Group (Canada).



Selling Units: The full sheet of six different stamps will be considered as a single unit and is the only selling unit for this issue. Customers with standing order requirements for se-tenant of mini-sheet and for mini-sheet will receive this issue through their account.



The designs:



Top row (from left to right):

The Gods Must Be Crazy Namibia, 2002

Maiko of Kyoto Japan, 2012

Baby on Her Back China, 2012



Bottom row (from left to right):

Genesis Girl Ethiopia, 2010

Baby Bat Mongolia, 2012

Goggle Girl United Republic of Tanzania, 2001





Stamp Specifications



Format: 30 mm horizontally by 40 mm vertically, perforation to perforation



Perforation: 13.5



Marginal inscriptions: The vertical mini-sheets of six stamps have one marginal inscriptions in the center of the bottom margin. The marginal inscription consists of the United Nations emblem with the text "United" above and the text "Nations" below the emblem. One copyright symbol with the year 2012 appears in the lower left margin. The artist's signature appears in the lower right margin.



Sheet size: The sheet size measures 110 mm horizontally by 140 mm vertically.



Quantity: 234,000 stamps (39,000 sheets)



Printing: The stamps were printed in offset by the Lowe-Martin Group (Canada).



Selling Units: The full sheet of six different stamps will be considered as a single unit and is the only selling unit for this issue. Customers with standing order requirements for se-tenant of mini-sheet and for mini-sheet will receive this issue through their account.



The designs:



Top row (from left to right):

Basha Blunderbuss Boy China, 2012

Turquoise, Coral and Circumambulation China, 2012

Bactrian Camel Cowboy Mongolia, 2012



Bottom row (from left to right):

Never Forgot to Play Mexico, 1998

Red Feathers Papua New Guinea, 2011

Haitian Sunshine Girl Haiti, 2010






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